Monthly Archives: February 2011

Daffodil Sock Pattern

Here is the pattern for my Daffodil Socks, as promised. I haven’t had anybody check this, and though I myself have looked over it a few times I wouldn’t be surprised if you notice a mistake. (though hopefully it would be the kind of mistake you would notice, rather than something that would mess you up!) Please feel free to let me know.

When I was knitting these I was quite unfamiliar with the short row heel method so I consulted this tutorial, which I highly recommend! Sometimes it helps to know what you are doing, instead of just following instructions blindly. Plus, it makes it possible to adjust sizing and so on.

Anyway, I hope you enjoy!

Daffodil Socks

Size: Newborn

Yarn: fingering weight

Needles: 2.0mm double pointed

Gauge: 8 sts = 1”

Abbreviations:

CO = Cast On

k = knit

p = purl

St(s) = stitch(s)

wst = wrap stitch

Picot Cast On

Using the Knit Cast On, CO 5 sts

BO 2 sts

Slip the stitch from the right needle back onto the left needle. (3 sts have been cast on)

Repeat until desired number of stitches have been cast on.

Wrap Stitch (wst)

On knit row: yf, sl1p, yb, replace st on left needle

On purl row: sl1p, yb, replace st on left needle, yf

Pick Up Wrap or Wraps

On knit row: Insert needle into wrap(s) from bottom to top, then into stitch. Knit these together.

On purl row: Insert needle into wrap(s) from bottom to top ON RIGHT SIDE and place this loop on the needle. Purl it together with the next stitch.

Knitting the Sock

CO 36 sts using picot cast on.

Join and work in the round, working k1, p1 rib

Continue working in rib until the piece measures 2” from cuff.

K 1 row.

P 3 rows.

K 2 rows.

P3 rows.

K1 row. During this row, redistribute the sts on the needles as follows:

Needle one: 9

Needle 2: 9

Needle 3: 18

 

Begin Heel

Next row: k 18. (these stitches become the top of the foot) the next 18 sts will be the heel. Work them as follows:

Row 1: k17, wst. Turn.

Row 2: p 16, wst. Turn.

Row 3: k15, wst. Turn.

Row 4: p14, wst. Turn

Continue working in established pattern, ending on a purl row: P8, wst. Turn. (8 sts remain in the middle, unwrapped, with 5 wrapped sts on either side.)

 

Turn Heel

Row 1: k 8, k1 while picking up wrap, wst. Turn.

Row 2: p9, p1 while picking up wrap, wst. Turn.

Row 3: k 10, k1 while picking up 2 wraps, wst.

Row 4: p 11, p1 while picking up 2 wraps, wst. Turn.

Continue working in established pattern (rows 3 and 4) ending on purl row: p 15, p1 while picking up 2 wraps, wst. Turn.

Next row: k16, k1 while picking up 2 wraps, wst. (this stitch will be from needle 1) Turn.

Next row: p 17, p1 while picking  up 2 wraps, wst (this will be from needle 2) turn

Next row: k 18

 

The heel is done! It’s time to knit in the round again, starting with the top of the foot.

Foot

Next row: k1 while picking up wrap, k 16, k1 while picking up wrap, k18

Work in stst until foot measures 2 ½”.

 

Toe

The toe is worked back and forth over the first 18 sts.

Row 1: k17, wst. Turn.

Row 2: p 16, wst. Turn.

Row 3: k15, wst. Turn.

Row 4: p14, wst. Turn

Continue working in established pattern, ending on a purl row: P8, wst. Turn. (8 sts remain in the middle, unwrapped, with 5 wrapped sts on either side.)

Turn Toe

Row 1: k 8, k1 while picking up wrap, wst. Turn.

Row 2: p9, p1 while picking up wrap, wst. Turn.

Row 3: k 10, k1 while picking up 2 wraps, wst. Turn.

Row 4: p 11, p1 while picking up 2 wraps, wst. Turn.

Continue working in established pattern (rows 3 and 4) ending on purl row: p 17, p 1 while picking up 2 wraps. Turn.

 

Graft 18 toe sts to the 18 remaining foot sts. Weave in ends.

 

 

 

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White

No words. Just some “white” from the last few days. It was somewhat of a theme.

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Action Word Art

Yesterday, I started teaching a winter-break class at the AGNS for 4-5s called “On the Move”.  As the Canada Winter Games are taking place in Halifax, we were asked to tie the theme of our class to the games, or more broadly, “movement”.

I had various things planned yesterday, one of which was a moving valentine, but I think one of the most successful was an activity I came up with as a “filler”. (These kids can get through a lot of things in 3 hours, since in general 30 minutes is the limit, at least for some.) I originally thought we would use paint for this, but since we had just been doing some painting for another activity, I turned to pastels and resist. (Oh resist, how I love you. You make EVERYTHING amazing.)

The children were each given a large sheet of water-colour paper and a box of pastels was placed on the table. Before starting we talked a bit about “action words” and I asked them to come up with some examples. Then I told them to each pick a pastel, and that when I said an action word, they were to make the pastel respond. I actually phrased it a few different ways, both making the pastel do the action, or making the line to the action. I gave them a few second with each word before asking them to stop, pick another pastel, and respond to another word. Here are some of the words I used: bounce, slither, zap, plop, ooze, fly, skip, ripple, run, zoom….

They were remarkably focused. I liked seeing how they approached negotiating the words. Some responded in a kinesthetic way, using violent scribbling for “zoom”, while others tried to show the action visually, with clean lines racing from one side of the page to the other.

When we were done (the pages had started to fill up!) I invited them to add some more colour to their work with water-colour paint. (did I mention how much I love resist?)

I plan to display these at the end of the class show, along with a list of the action words we used. If we have time we may revisit these later in the week, and see if we can spot the various actions hidden in the work.

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Before Valentine’s Day

On this Saturday before Valentine’s Day

I made Valentines with the kids at Autism Arts

and baked some sugar cookies in the shape of hearts for a little knitting gathering.

Valentine’s Day itself will be quite busy, but this was nice.

 

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Daffodil Socks

It’s cold and snowy out there, but I am looking ahead to spring, for many reasons. And while I can’t tell you exactly where this idea came from, I’m sure that was what was behind these baby socks.

These are Daffodil socks, for what I hope are obvious reasons. Baby socks may be a somewhat impractical thing to knit, but they are fast. These were slower than they should have been because I admit I had a case of mush brain and had to pull out and re-knit the heel OF EACH SOCK. This is ridiculous since they are very straight forward and I have it memorized, but what can you do?

There will be a free pattern for these coming soon! It’s almost ready, in fact, but I know I can’t get it done today and this space has been quiet for a while so I thought I’d let you in on what I’ve been working on.

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I Made Pita Bread

(7:30am…)

Last night (and this morning) I made some pita bread. Pockets included. Who knew it was this easy?? Well, I’m sure some people knew, but I definitely didn’t. The recipe is from Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day, which I blogged about before. As I mentioned before, the idea behind the book is that you mix a large batch of dough that lives in the fridge, and then cut pieces off to quickly make a loaf. That method itself means you can have a fresh loaf with hardly any work time (this is the five minute part) but the fantastic thing about pita bread is that it literally takes 5-7 minutes to cook and needs no resting or rising time! I made some last night and we ate it with homemade hummus and some greens and then, because it is so quick, I made some more this morning so Gary would have something to take to lunch.

The pita can be made from several different pre-mixed doughs in the book. I used Light Whole Wheat but you can find the recipe for the European Peasant here if you want to try making your own pita. I’ll include the directions here, but I do really recommend getting the book since there are so many recipes. If you make bread you could probably try this with your own dough as long as it is a very soft dough, and just a flour/water/yeast/salt kind of dough. You do need a baking stone. (I think mostly these are sold as pizza stones. And if you like baking bread you should probably have one.)

1. Preheat oven to 500F with the stone on the middle shelf. At this point, your dough should be in the refrigerator.

2. Just before baking dust the dough with flour and cut of an orange sized piece. I weigh mine and a large pita is 8oz of dough. Shape the dough into a ball by stretching the surface of the dough around to the bottom on all sides. Dust the counter with lots of flour and place your ball on the counter.

3. Roll out the dough with a rolling-pin to a 1/8 inch thickness. Dust the rolling-pin liberally with flour, and flip the bread occasionally to stop if from sticking. Place the pita on a floured peel.

4. Slide the pita onto the stone. Turn on your ventilation fan, as extra flour may smoke at such a high temperature. Bake for 5-7 minutes until lightly browned and puffed. If you are making more you should be rolling one out as this one is baking. Mine didn’t really brown much but did puff.

5. Remove pita from the oven and wrap in a clean cotton towel. And that’s it. Eat warm or use to make pita sandwiches.

 

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